Japanese names and how to read them
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Japanese names and how to read them a manual for art-collectors and students, being a concise and comprehensive guide to the reading and interpretation of Japanese proper names both geographical and personal, as well as of dates and other formal expressions by Albert J. Koop

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  • 61 Currently reading

Published by Routledge & Kegan Paul in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Names, Personal -- Japanese.,
  • Names, Geographical -- Japanese.,
  • Art, Japanese.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Albert J. Koop and Hogitaro Inada.
ContributionsInada, Hogitaro .
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL528 .K7, PL528 .K7, PL528 .K7, PL528 .K7
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 552, [8] p.
Number of Pages552
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14122692M
LC Control Number23005550

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  Japanese names and how to read them a manual for art-collectors and students, being a concise and comprehensive guide to the reading and interpretation of Japanese proper names both geographical and personal as well as of dates and other formal expressions. by Albert J. Koop. 3 Want to read.   Japanese names and how to read them: a manual for art-collectors and students, being a concise and comprehensive guide to the reading and interpretation of Japanese proper names both geographical and personal as well as of dates and other formal expressions: Koop, Albert J. (Albert James), Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming: Internet : Download: JAPANESE NAMES AND HOW TO READ THEM BOOK PDF Best of all, they are entirely free to find, use and download, so there is no cost or stress at all. japanese names and how to read them book PDF may not make exciting reading, but japanese names and how to read them book is packed with valuable instructions, information and warnings.   Last names are often pretty easy to read, since there are so many of them. First names are a nightmare since people are more concerned with the number of strokes and the meaning of the kanji when deciding their child’s name rather then how easy it is for a passerby to read.

Japanese people cannot always certainly read each other's names when they are written in kanji. Although family names are usually simple, there are many which have unusual pronunciations. Given names may be easy or almost impossible to read, and one name may have more than one pronunciation. For example, 長田 may be read Nagada or Nagata.   Names. Reading them sounds easy, and something that would come instantly. Yet they take a long time to master. Not only is it hard to remember the vast amount of Japanese names, many take unique readings on common kanji, or use rarer kanji you’ve never seen, and combine in ways destined to confuse you.   Defined as the stockpiling of books that will never be consumed, the term is a Japanese portmanteau of sorts, combining the words “tsunde” (meaning “to stack things”), “oku” (meaning “to leave for a while”) and “doku” (meaning “to read”). We were reminded of the term this week, when Apartment Therapy published a primer for those looking to complete book-hoarder rehab. I would add that Japanese can also be written and read the same as Western languages - words written horizontally and read left to write. Children's books are often written this way - particularly picture books.

Yomimaru is a great blog that shares links and resources for Japanese reading practice, and it also has some original articles in easy Japanese. You can search by topic or by JLPT level. Great for intermediate and upper beginners, as long as you know hiragana and katakana. Search for articles in the category JLPT N5 if you’re lower level. Japanese Names and How to Read Them by Albert J. Koop, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Japanese novel using kanji kana majiri bun (text with both kanji and kana), the most general orthography for modern Japanese. Ruby characters (or furigana) are also used for kanji words (in modern publications these would generally be omitted for well-known kanji).The text is in the traditional tategaki ("vertical writing") style; it is read down the columns and from right to left, like Languages: Japanese language. Now that we’re well prepared with dictionaries and log journals in hand, let’s learn to read in Japanese—step by step. Learn Japanese with Books: 6 Fail-proof Steps to Reading in Japanese. Training yourself to read in another language doesn’t have to be daunting. After all, reading isn’t a race.